English
 
Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Air quality in Germany as a contributing factor to morbidity from COVID-19

Koch, S., Hoffmann, C., Caseiro, A., Ledebur, M., Menk, M., von Schneidemesser, E. (2022): Air quality in Germany as a contributing factor to morbidity from COVID-19. - Environmental Research, 214, Part 2, 113896.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2022.113896

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
6001745.pdf (Publisher version), 4MB
Name:
6001745.pdf
Description:
Fulltext
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
CC BY 4.0

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Koch, Susanne1, Author
Hoffmann, Christina1, Author
Caseiro, Alexandre2, Author              
Ledebur, Marie1, Author
Menk, Mario1, Author
von Schneidemesser, Erika2, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2IASS Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies Potsdam, ou_96022              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: SARS-CoV-2, Air pollution, Intensive care medicine, Mechanical ventilation, Mortality, Nitrogen dioxide
 Abstract: Background The SARS-CoV-2 virus has been spreading in Germany since January 2020, with regional differences in incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Long-term exposure to air pollutants as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen monoxide (NO), ozone (O3), and particulate matter (<10 μm PM10, <2.5 μm PM2.5) has a negative impact on respiratory functions. We analyze the association between long-term air pollution and the outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infections in Germany. Methods We conducted an observational study in Germany on county-level, investigating the association between long-term (2010–2019) air pollutant exposure (European Environment Agency, AirBase data set) and COVID-19 incidence, morbidity, and mortality rate during the first outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 (open source data Robert Koch Institute). We used negative binominal models, including adjustment for risk factors (age, sex, days since first COVID-19 case, population density, socio-economic and health parameters). Results After adjustment for risk factors in the tri-pollutant model (NO2, O3, PM2.5) an increase of 1 μg/m³ NO2 was associated with an increase of the need for intensive care due to COVID-19 by 4.2% (95% CI 1.011–1.074), and mechanical ventilation by 4.6% (95% CI 1.010–1.084). A tendency towards an association of NO2 with COVID-19 incidence was indicated, as the results were just outside of the defined statistical significance (+1.6% (95% CI 1.000–1.032)). Long-term annual mean NO2 level ranged from 4.6 μg/m³ to 32 μg/m³.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2022-072022-11
 Publication Status: Finally published
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Environmental Research
Source Genre: Journal, E14, SCI, Scopus
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 214 (Part 2) Sequence Number: 113896 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0013-9351
CoNE: https://publications.iass-potsdam.de/cone/journals/resource/201604202